• Adjust Text Size
  • a
  • a
  • a

Union: (908) 206.0444Montclair: (973) 509.2777

English Spanish

Is Your Child Receiving the Education They Need? Picking the Right School Environment for Your Child

  • deron
  • May 27, 2016

schoolA good education can last a lifetime and provide countless opportunities for your child, but picking the right starting point can be difficult, especially for parents of children with learning disabilities such as autism. Each child has a unique set of emotional, educational, and care taking needs, which should all be addressed before they enter the educational system. For parents who aren’t sure where to begin, here are a few common questions, answered.

What difficulties will a child with autism have in a classroom setting?
Every case of Autism in children is different, and as such, they will have varying behaviors and symptoms, but there are a few common factors to keep in mind. Autistic children of kindergarten age (three to five years old) have a more difficult time exhibiting social understanding and respond to others’ emotions, which may make interacting in a classroom setting difficult at first. In addition, many children have trouble interacting and cooperating with other children, which may create social barriers.

What kind of programs can help autistic children in school?
Because children with learning disabilities in school may have some difficulties, a variety of programs is available to assist them in whatever way they may need. Working with learning disabilities requires programs that are tailored to each student for their varying needs. In fact, all students with special needs receive an individualized education program (IEP) so both the teacher and parents have a clear idea of how the student’s needs will be met.

Special needs program or public school?
Some children are identified as candidates for special education programs at a very young age because of their medical history, but most of the time, there is a choice for parents to make. While specialized schools offer much-needed individualization of programs and one on one time with teachers, they often lack the amount of socialization that public schools offer. In contrast, public schools may offer too much social stimulation and not enough educational assistance.

In the end, the decision should be made with the best program for each child in mind. No two humans are alike, and educational needs vary greatly from one person to the next. The best thing anyone can do is closely examine all of the options available to them and choose the best program for their child.